Custom Bitmoji Feedback

I love Bitmojis. I love to show people how easy Bitmoji is to use in Google apps with the Bitmoji Chrome extension. I love to make these Bitmojis custom with your school logo or Google or Ditch That Textbook on the shirt. Here are a few I’ve created and use often.

Algebra 1 CHS Bitmoji (1)

The second one is my Algebra 1 team. We shared a Google Drawing and each dropped in our Bitmojis. We used this for back-to-school documents.

Bitmoji NTI

This one we made as a header for Google Classroom. This was our technology group that presented at our New Teacher Institute this year. We each had our school shirt on. LOVE IT!

Before I get sidetracked by all the fun things we can do with custom Bitmojis, this is really about creating custom FEEDBACK Bitmojis for your students.

Rock Star Work

Before you begin, you will need to download the Bitmoji Chrome Extension. If you haven’t created your Bitmoji, stop, do it now, RIGHT NOW! You are missing out on soooo much fun!

Bitmoji created? Ok, resume the blog post.

This first video is a short tutorial on how to create a custom Bitmoji in Google Drawing. This can be used in ANYTHING, not just Google Keep. I use these in Google Slides and on Twitter all the time.

This alone should make your day. But if you want the awesomeness to continue, place these images in Google Keep for quick feedback in Google Docs. The next video will show you how to do this.

Please share your custom Bitmojis with me on Twitter (@TTmomTT). Here’s a Twitter tip, download your custom Bitmoji as a .jpg so the background turns white. Most of the time you want a transparent background but Twitter will turn that transparent background black and make it more difficult to see.

Hope to see your custom Bitmoji around the Twittersphere.

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Categories: Bitmoji, Google Drawing, Google Keep | 1 Comment

My year with #GoogleEI

I can’t believe that a year has passed. It seems like yesterday when I was sitting at my computer, waiting to see if I had been selected. I was more than excited when I was selected and the fast and furious adventure began.

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What a wonderful group of educators you are surrounded by in the Innovator program. I am amazed at our ideas and desire to make education better. If you follow the #GoogleEI hashtag on Twitter you will see the amazing group of people I have been honored to join.

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I miss my #TOR16 group and wish we could see each other more! I hear other cohorts talk about their group members and now I completely understand the awe and respect they have for each other. This group is amazing!

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My innovator project started as an idea to use Google Expeditions in the math classroom. With encouragement from my coaches, it morphed into an online repository of activities to Make Math Not Suck. The name, logo, and website design have gone through many iterations but I am so happy with the results. I love when other teachers send me a message telling me that the projects or questioning activities I’ve shared have helped them. This is what #GoogleEI is all about. Sharing your ideas with the world to make the world a better place. I’ve had the opportunity to share this information at Google Summits, conferences, and with schools. #GoogleEI opens so many doors so you can share more. I want to give a huge shout-out to Shaelynn Farnsworth, my amazing mentor. She has encouraged and challenged me and helped make my project better. I hope I can measure up to her when I become a mentor.

Make Math Not Suck Logo (4) (1)

So… this is the end of my first year as a Google Innovator. I can’t say thank you enough for the experience, the opportunity, the challenge, the collaboration, the support, and most of all the family. I look forward to representing the #GoogleEI group with new ideas.

To my #TOR16 family… I wish we were all closer.  Our academy time together was amazing, and I love running into cohort members at different events.  I love to see everyone’s accomplishments and look forward to seeing how we continue to make education better.

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If you are considering applying to be a Google for Education Innovator, GO FOR IT! This has been one of the best decisions of my life!

Categories: Google EI, ramblings | Leave a comment

Memory Game with Google Slides

I REALLY dislike cutting out paper activities. This dislike is what prompted me to create my first activity (drag and drop Geometry Proofs) with technology. When my team found a fun Memory Game activity I CRINGED at the thought of cutting out all of those sets and then finding a place to store them.

memory.ngsversion.1438028331698.adapt.1900.1I went through a few attempts to create a memory game in Google Slides. I thought about linking pages but I needed to see two at a time. I wanted to remove one element “on click” but I could only get them to dissolve in a specific order. I settled on deleting the cards and it worked like a charm.

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I know, you are all wanting to create your own memory game now! You’re in luck, I have a quick tutorial for you!

Memory NumbersI used the basic white background so it didn’t distract from game. Place all of the “back side” of the cards, the part with the content, evenly spaced on your background. I ended up putting boxes around mine to help me get them spaced. I love that Google Slides give you guide lines as you place your items.

Parallel & Perpendicular Memory Game (4)

You can also use the arrange menu and select horizontal or vertical and align them perfectly.

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Memory Numbers (1)This is probably the most important step. We don’t want the background to be deleted while we are playing the game. Once you have the “back side” set exactly as you want it, go to file – download as – and pick jpg or png. Screen Shot 2017-10-01 at 5.23.00 PM

Once it’s downloaded, delete all of your elements. I know, that’s scary. I do go into my history and set that version as editable background, you know, just in case you made a mistake.

Now you will set this as the background. There is a background button on the top middle of the menu bar. Once you click it, select your image and set as the background. Now you can breathe again. All of that work is still there, not gone forever!

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Memory Numbers (2)We are ready to make the cards. I used the rectangle shape and held down the SHIFT key to make sure I had perfect squares. Screen Shot 2017-10-01 at 5.30.27 PM

I used the gradient tool to select the background and put a ? on it just like the original memory game.

Screen Shot 2017-10-01 at 5.32.40 PM.pngOne suggestion from my students was to make this an image so the ? wasn’t editable. Sometimes when clicking on the square they got the ? instead.

You can copy and paste these and use the align tool again to get them close to where you want them. Then move them exactly where you need them.

Memory Numbers (3)Create the rules page. I’ve included the image of my rules page below. It explains how you would “flip” the cards over to play the game.

Parallel & Perpendicular Memory Game (5)

Memory Numbers (4)Play the game!

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I sent this to my students through Google Classroom and said make a copy for each student. They enjoyed it and learned from the activity as well.

If you make a memory game, please share! I love to see how people use my ideas.

 

Categories: Google Slides, technology, Uncategorized | 11 Comments

Solar Eclipse Breakout

This is a cross-post with Make Math Not Suck

The Total Solar Eclipse happens at the beginning of our school year. Since we will still be in the introduction/relationship building phase and won’t have learned new content, I wanted to create a BreakoutEDU that included prior knowledge. I searched online to see if any already existed and stumbled upon a digital one created by Wendy Lentz. I loved it, but my students won’t have their Chromebooks yet, so I needed one that wasn’t 100% reliant on technology. I also wanted to incorporate math. I did borrow her video and Google Form (with her permission) and included it in my Breakout. Definitely check out Wendy’s! She did an amazing job.

BreakoutEDUlogo.png

I plan to do this with my Freshman. You can adapt it for any age you like. I’ve linked to the folder with all of my resources. You will need to make a copy to edit. The form will not be editable for you but you can email me if you would like the ability to edit.

My breakout needs a small, medium, and large box. It uses the following locks: 3-digit, two 4-digit, 4- letter, 5-letter, directional, & a keyed padlock.

You will also need a Chromebook or iPad and black light with marker. I have included instructions to make red-letter code glasses and you will need red cellophane and cardstock to make those.

Please let me know if you use it and/or tag me in your photos on Twitter (@TTmomTT). I love to see students using resources I’ve shared.

Categories: BreakoutEDU, Solving Equations | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Reflection from #ISTE17

ISTE17 logo

I was so lucky to attend ISTE again this year. I had even more to look forward to than last year because I knew what to expect. The keynotes were amazing. I was able to sketchnote 2 of them. So powerful and inspiring. Jeb Abumrad was funny and gave us tips about finding our voice and using the Gut Churn feeling to accomplish what we set out to do. Jennie Mageira (a fellow Google Innovator) inspired us to change the story that we tell and embrace who we are and what we have to offer.

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Is was able to see 2 of the 3 ignite sessions. These might be my favorite part. I didn’t have my iPad to sketch the first one but the second one I was ready. It was amazing! My friend Tara Martin presented on #booksnaps and she rocked it and my Google Innovator coach Sylvia Duckwork presented #sketchnotes. Sylvia is ALWAYS amazing! Christine Pinto presented on #GAFE4Littles, another amazing person to follow on Twitter.

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I also attended some very interesting sessions. I loved the poster sessions and learned more about Minecraft EDU and visited with another educator that also uses Comics in her classroom. I especially like the sessions that present more than one idea, like Matt Miller and Kasey Bell’s Google Classroom session. My favorite had to be Alice Keeler and Jo Boaler (who joined us via video chat). They both have amazing ideas and to have them share together was more than you could ask for.

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The “unscheduled” sessions are also amazing. Tara Martin and Tisha Richmond held a #booksnaps session. I sat in and helped teach people how to use Snapchat to create them. My favorite was Wanda Terrel’s 7:45 AM session about Sketchnotes. I loved being with other educators who sketchnote and I learned a few tricks with Procreate that I didn’t know before. I got to sit by Marie-Andre, a friend and Google Innovator from my cohort. So much fun!

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CoffeeEDU with Alice at 6 A.M. (yes, you have to be dedicated to go to that one, but it’s worth it) was fun as usual. I met some great educators and got to share my passion for learning.

It was also like a family reunion for my #DitchBook family and my #GoogleEI #TOR16 family. I was able to visit with both groups extensively and meet some other Google Innovators from my state and around the world. It’s alaways hard to leave like minded educators once you are in there presence.

DitchFam

Google Family

Since we were in San Antonio we visited the Alamo and took a boat through the canals. But nothing compares to the energy, knowledge, and collaboration that happens inside that convention center.

Until Chicago next year – So long ISTE17

Categories: ISTE17, ramblings, sketchnotes | 2 Comments

Google Keep for the classroom

Have you used Google Keep? Do you love sticky notes? Google Keep is sticky notes 100 times better. You can go to keep.google.com or click on the keepicon to get there.

So yes, it is sticky note app. You can take notes, color code, and add labels to these notes, but it is so much more. Here are a few of the things you might not know Google Keep can do.

1. Plan Book

I like to make labels for the top of the notes and keep those 4 notes at the top so it works as my plan book. I can access it from any device and it’s easy to update. I did steal this idea from Kasey Bell at Shake Up Learning.

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I created my headers in Google Drawing. I used insert image and selected from the Creative Commons free use library and then added a shape with a custom color and increased the transparency. Of course, the one at the end is a Bitmoji because everything is better with a Bitmoji :-). I love that I can set reminders inside my notes. I don’t always want to open my calendar to create a reminder and it’s convenient that I can do it while creating the note.

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2. Save to Google Keep

There is a Chrome Extension that allows you to send bookmarks directly to Google Keep. When you are on a site, click the lightbulb and a window will pop-up with the link and the option to make a note.

Save to Google Keep

I love this features, especially when I’m in Twitter. I like and retweet so many things that I can never find them later. Sending them to Google Keep prevents me from losing great ideas. It’s a simple as right-click (or control-click) and the menu pops up and allows you to send it to Keep.

Save to Google Keep (1)

3. Capture Text

This one kind of blew my mind. You can take any image (not PDF but we will address that in just a second) and upload it to Google Keep. Then click on the three dots at the bottom (more) and select Grab image text. Scroll beneath your image and magic has happened. Text was created from the image. It’s not perfect, but for that document that you only have a pdf for, now you can get the text from it and NOT have to retype all of the information. I the example below, I have a book that is out of print and I wanted to share it with another teacher.

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That brings me to the PDF issue. You can’t upload the PDF as an image. No problem on a Mac (I’m sure PC and Chromebooks have something similar). You can open the PDF in Preview and then export as JPEG. Now you have an image that you can upload to Google Keep. Easy Peasy!

4. Drawing

Now, you can also do this with Google Drawing using the scribble tool but if you are already in Keep, then there is a drawing feature. You can download the image, copy it to Google Docs or share it just like any other Keep note. Students can quickly draw their thoughts and share them.

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This didn’t cover the basics of Google Keep. Get in there and play with it. I think you will love it as much as I do.

Thumbs up Bitmoji

Categories: Google Keep | Tags: | 1 Comment

Geometric Town Project

This is a culminating project that we do in Geometry. It was originally created by a colleague of mine who has since retired. It has gone through many revisions over the past 6 year. I love that it reviews parallel line angle relationships, equations of lines, properties of quadrilaterals, perimeter & area and equations of circles. Not to mention it allows for some student choice and creativity. I’ve posted the most recent update and some examples of student work. Students create the map of a town using the specified guidelines from the town planner.

Project Link

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This is a wonderful end of the year project to tie in with previous knowledge. I hope you can use this in your classroom.

Cross posted on Mathmathnotsuck.wordpress.com

Categories: Geometry | Tags: | Leave a comment

Make Math Not Suck

My Google Innovator project is ready to be released. Make Math Not Suck is a website where I will post questioning and activities to take the drudgery out of math class. I will still be posting here as well and sometimes they will be mirrored posts. I will also be taking submissions from others so I can include awesome activities that others do to make math better. Please visit and share with others.

https://makemathnotsuck.wordpress.com/

Make Math Not Suck 2 (2)

Categories: Google EI, Make Math Not Suck | Tags: | Leave a comment

Measuring height with Trig

I started to share this project with someone the other day and realized I had never written a blog post for it. We have used this project for quite some time and I love the digital aspect having students label their image and explain their process. We have the students make the clinometers but we give them little guidance as far as the project goes. We want them to problem solve and figure it out. We simply tell them to go measure something bigger than they are. I also limit their travel to school grounds (I did have a student go to the nearby gas station once. You have to be specific!!) I had a group of students last year that forgot their tape measure so they measured in shoe length (yes, I had a one-shoed student outside) and then converted that to inches when they came inside. I love the thought process behind their solution!

Not only does this give purpose to the study of trig, it also gets students outside and working together. It also helps students understand angle of elevation a little better with concrete examples.

I love the first one. She wrote a word problem for her image. Hmm… might have to steal that idea!!

I’ve included my clinometer document (I did steal the image from someone, sorry whoever you are!) and my scoring guide.

Trig Project Scoring Guide

GuideBuild a Clinometer

Happy measuring! Concur Bitmoji

Categories: Geometry, Google Drawing, Google Slides, Trig | Tags: | Leave a comment

Popcorn Containers and Volume

Anytime you can have food in class it’s a good day (unless you are the custodian sweeping up popcorn. I’m sorry!) I came up with this project probably four years ago. We did the whole pour the water from a cone into a cylinder thing, and it was ok, but I wanted something better. While eating popcorn at the movies, my daughter and I started talking about the cost of the popcorn and the sizes available. Putting those two ideas together, this project was born.

The first year I had students create a cylinder and then figure out how to make a cone with the same base area and height. This was a struggle and I ended up showing them. It does involve a lot of thinking and many would not have gotten there on their own. The following year, I created a hand-drawn example of how to calculate the dimensions of the cone. I now have the information in Google Slides for students to use.

There are great discussions about the slant height becoming the radius of the cone. I do have to show students a visual of this and they are always amazed. Once they see the visual and we discuss how the circumference of the cone piece has to meet up with the base circle, they begin to see how it all fits together.

I’ve included the activity for the first day. I’ve popped trashbags full of popcorn and I’ve popped microwave popcorn. If you can get your concession stand to open up their popcorn machine then you have it made.

Popcorn Container Activity

As a follow-up activity, I decided to have students calculate the cost and the amount for which they could sell their popcorn. This allows them to make some decisions about which container would be best. Many of them tell me that it doesn’t matter which one is the best deal because the cone of popcorn would be inconvenient. 🙂

Popcorn Surface Area & Volume Follow-up activity

PopcornEnjoy!

Categories: Geometry, Google Sheets, performance task | Tags: | Leave a comment

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