technology

Bitmojis in the Classroom

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If you’re not familiar with Bitmojis, YOU ARE MISSING OUT! It’s you in an avatar with a ton of different sayings and situations. It’s an app you can download (iOs & Android) and a very user friendly Chrome extension.

It is fun, but it also has a TON of applications in the classroom. Since it integrates with Chrome so well, you can drag your bitmoji into most Google Apps as feed back for students.

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Sometimes my students leave me “suggested” feedback through Bitmojis as well. a

I recently used Bitmojis to enhance my Superhero Transformations activity for Geometry. It was a HUGE hit!

This idea came from a discussion with the AMAZING Sylvia Duckworth. I’ve included her slide deck full of ideas as well. My example is on there but so are a ton of other amazing examples of how to use Bitmoji comics.

Here is the example I gave my students. We also had a quick exploratory lesson about how to transform the Bitmojis through the arrange menu (or 2 finger click or key command) and a quick lesson on how to crop and mask images.

I was even more impressed after my students submitted their projects.

Example 1     Example 2    Example 3   Template to create your own (make a copy to edit it)

I created some examples for my non-math friends when I presented this to my school. How about a comic in a foreign language, or a political cartoon?

Now if you are a fan of Snapchat, you probably already know that Bitmojis are sticker options inside of it. You can also send “together” bitmojis in a message.

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me & my daughter

Tara Martin shared her idea about using Snapchat and bitmojis with book selections and a new hashtag was born – #booksnaps. You take a pic of a book selection you like, annotate & add your bitmoji. Read about it on Tara’s blog here.

booksnap-example

And if you don’t want to open the world of Snapchat in your classroom, this can be done through Google Drawing or Google Slides.

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A quick disclaimer on Bitmoji, there are a few that are not school appropriate. This isn’t any different from anything else you find online. Talk to your students about using Bitmoji responsibly and open up a whole new world for them.

Follow me on snapchat if you would like. image-1

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Categories: Bitmoji, Geometry, technology | Tags: , | Leave a comment

CYOA Geometry Style

Choose Your Own Adventure was such a success in Algebra that we wanted to try it in Geometry. This served as our unit 7 assessment. We followed the same process that we did here but I did update the process so students could plan electronically using this planning form. I also had students create this in New Forms so the process is slightly different than my original post.

The biggest difference between old Forms and new Forms is inserting a page compared to new section.

Untitled drawing (4)

We also used Google Drawing so students could create their geometry problems using tangents, secants, arcs & chords. Many students had never used Google Drawing and they were very excited how nice their images looked.

Two Tangents

Students had to get 3 peer reviews, which meant a student worked through their adventure, correct and incorrect answers, then gave feedback on improvements. They used this document to guide them through the peer reviews.  The result SHOULD have been a product that met all of the requirements. Some students don’t peer edit as well as other but they learned quickly that being NICE doesn’t help you improve.

Here are a few of my favorite projects. I told them I wouldn’t publish them unless they were correct. 🙂

Journey to Pasta

Royals Rally

First Day of School

Making it to the Movies

 

Categories: Chromebook, Geometry, Google Drawing, Google Forms, performance task, technology | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Make a Digital #BreakoutEDU

They let me guest moderate a #DitchBook twitter chat last Thursday on #BreakoutEDU. It was A-Mazing! Matt Miller (@jmattmiller), author of Ditch That Textbook, has a tremendous chat at 9 PM each Thursday. The DitchBook team is very supportive and welcomed a newbie like me in without a blink of an eye. Karly Moura (@karlymoura) was so patient and supportive and co-moderated with me to make the experience wonderful. I do hope they will let me do it again sometime.

I love #BreakoutEDU for the problem-solving qualities and for encouraging perseverance. I have a Breakout box that I made. I purchased a wooden treasure chest at Michael’s and my wonderful husband but a locking hasp on it. I purchased all of my locks at Amazon or Wal-Mart, but Lowe’s and Home Depot have many to choose from also. A really awesome Date Lock was shared on #DitchBook that I need to add to my collection.

As I prepared for the chat, I knew I wanted our group to experience a digital Breakout. I had participated in a chat where we got to do one created in Google Forms and it was fun. But then I stumbled upon (thanks Sean Fahey @seanfahey another awesome #DitchBook team member) some digital breakouts created in Google Sites. THIS was what I wanted. So I set out to figure out how to do it. I’m going to share the process below. Talk about Google App Smashing! This uses Sites, Forms, Drawing & YouTube.

Look through the one I created or the links above to see how everything works before you read the tutorial below. Digital Breakout Data Cruncher

You will want to write your story and have an idea (or a list) of the links and resources that you will use. Being prepared ahead of time will make the process go more quickly.

Sites: If you plan to make a lot of these, you could have one digital BreakoutEDU site and each Breakout would be a new page within your site. That what I plan to do next, I just didn’t think through it this first time, just jumped in feet first (as usual).

BReakout Image

You want to set up your page with one column and insert a table with 2 columns. If you choose the site layout with two columns, it won’t leave enough room for your image. You will insert the Google Form into the left column and your Google Drawing in the right column when they are complete.

Layout

Drawing: Now you need to create your Drawing with invisible hotspots. Make sure you use images with Creative Commons License to modify and give credit as per the CC License. Once you have your image, create a shape on top of the image. Set the outline and fill to transparent. You can click on the invisible image and insert a link to the resource you want to use. Repeat this process for all the links in your Breakout.

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Forms: Next you need to create the Form so participants can enter their answers. I started by inserting a video into the form with a countdown timer. BreakoutEDU has a timer you can use that’s 45 minutes, the typical breakout time, but I wanted 15 minutes for the chat so I selected one from YouTube. Next you want to set your locks. You need to validate the answer so it will only unlock with the CORRECT answer.  Here is a link to a youtube video from the digital BreakoutEDU experts Justin Birckbichler (@Mr_B_Teacher) and Mari Venturino (@MsVenturino) explaining how to set your locks to validate.

I also wanted a reward for breaking out, so I created a badge in Google Drawing, downloaded it as a .png and put the link to the image in the confirmation page.

Once your drawing and form are complete, embed them into your site. Test the game and have many others test the game to make sure it does what you intend. Once you’ve beta tested, share it with the world (or at least your class) and let them have fun.

I came up with the process on my own, but the experts mentioned above, Justin and Mari, have a page with resources to make your own. I didn’t find that page until after I’d worked through the process.  I did link to two of their videos above but there are many more nuggets of goodness on their page.

If you make a digital BreakoutEDU, please share on our crowdsourced Padlet and/or send the link on Twitter with the #DitchBook hashtag and we can beta-test for you.

Categories: BreakoutEDU, Google Drawing, Google Forms, Google Sites, technology, Uncategorized | Tags: , , | 1 Comment

GraphFree

I try not to just promote apps and websites but I found a gem for anyone wanting to create their own math content.  You know how pre-created material have those fancy official looking graphs?  With arrows at both ends! GraphFree.com is exactly what you’ve been looking for. Scatter plots for line of fit practice, one and two variable inequalities, any function… they all look good.

Why do I create my own content?  I differentiate instruction in my classroom and I’m always needing more practice for standards. This site has been amazing for creating these resources. I’ve used them in Google docs and slide activities too.  The image quality is great.

I didn’t show it on the graphs below, but you can label and number each axis. It’s very versatile.

If you try it out and like it, let me know!

Categories: technology, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Superhero Transformations

I found this project a few years ago and I’ve had the students create them on paper.  The products are always very impressive and students love the project.  The original link can be found here. This year I wanted the students to create online using Google Docs and Draw.  It was a little bit of a learning curve, but I like that the student used the transformation tools built into Google Docs.  I’ve posted a few examples below and also my updated version of the original project I linked to above.  It really helps the students visualize transformations and helps them use this vocabulary in context of their situation.

Comic Transformation Map - Madelyn Fuller

StudentSampleforTransformationcomic

ComicStripTransformationexample2

Documents

Information Sheet & Scoring Guide

Categories: Geometry, technology, Uncategorized | Tags: , | 3 Comments

Drag & Drop with Google Slides & Draw

When we got our iPads, I wanted some interactive activities for my students.  Using Pages, I created my first drag & drop activity.  When we transitioned to Chrome, I also transitioned my platform.  I started using Google Draw.  I created one page proofs for students to practice with, taken from a paper activity I used year after year.

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Once I figured out how to force a copy for slides (now Classroom does it for me!) I started making multiple practice pages with slides. Now I have a huge selection of activities that I use with all of my classes.  I’ve shared some below.

Geometry Proofs (see above)

Performance Event

Solving Equations

Protractor Practice

Writing Linear Equations

Students love using these activities, especially the Solving Equations & Writing Equations when they can work at their own pace.  I used both of these as remediation for standards students were stuck on.  It was a success!  I hope you find some inspiration with these and begin making some of your own.  Please share if you do!

Categories: proofs, Solving Equations, technology | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Barbie Bungee

Our Unit 2 linear equations project was the famous Barbie Bungee from Illuminations.  We added a creation component, a poster created as a full color magazine advertisement, to the project so the students would have an end product.  Students love to make Barbie bungee, a lot of them also loved creating the poster.  There was some disconnect between the two and some of their products had to be corrected to reflect their learning. Overall, we had some great practice creating linear regression equations & interpreting slope and intercepts.

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Barbie Bungee Unit 2 activity

Categories: linear regression, PBL, technology | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

#SJSDEdWeek Summary

Ed Week 2015 Logo

SJSDEdWeek 2015 was a huge success.  It’s always an awesome experience when you can learn with and from your fellow colleagues.  Our 3 speakers were amazing and challenged us to look at learning differently. I have posted the links to the presentations below.  You can also follow #SJSDEdWeek on Twitter.  We have folks still tweeting at the hashtag when they use something we’ve learned.

Day 1: highlight video

Josh Stumpenhorst – Lessons from the Run

Stumpenhorst keynote sketch note

Josh Stumpenhorst – Social Media

Google Gab

Symbaloo

Day 2:  highlight video

Eric Langhorst – Leveraging Technology to Enhance the Classroom Experience Langhorst keynote sketch note

Eric Langhorst- Twitter and other Social Media

All of Eric’s resources

Use This Not That

Day 3: highlight video

Justin Tarte – #futureready schools and the digital mindset

Tarte keynote sketch note

Justin Tarte – STEAMing full speed ahead with learning
Tech Showcase

Categories: EdWeek, technology | Tags: , | 2 Comments

Plickers

Our building focus this year is to incorporate exit slips into our daily routine.  There are so many really awesome programs and apps available that will grade and compile data for you.  Over the next few day, I plan to share some of the programs I have tried and found helpful (or fun)!

PlickersPlickers blew up on Twitter not long ago, so I had to see what the fuss was about.  This program definitely falls into the fun category.  I don’t use it every day, but it is a fun way to quickly assess vocabulary or a skill. I have tried this when students need to calculate and it doesn’t work as well.

Plickers uses the plickers.com website and an app for Apple or Android devices.  Students have a unique QR code and hold it up with the letter (ABC or D) facing up and the teacher scans the codes using a phone or tablet.  It instantly reads the answers and displays the results on the screen.  You can assign a card to a student and review the results later.  It doesn’t have the best reporting system and it doesn’t compile data for you.  It is fun and the students love seeing their name pop up on the screen when I scan their card.

Plickers 2This is a screen shot from a one question assessment I used to introduce my PD session in January.

Give Plickers a try.  I have quite a few teachers in my school who have tried this and they are also hooked!

Categories: formative assessment, technology | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Drag and Drop game in Pages

The first activity I created when they placed the iPad in my hands was a vocabulary drag and drop game.  I did import the table as a graphic and placed it in Pages but I don’t think you would have to.

drag and drop

 

The Pages file is attached, but it’s very easy to make your own.

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Categories: iPad, technology | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

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